D&RGW Aspen Branch Trail

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The D&RGW Aspen Branch Trail is a trail located in Colorado.

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Little Raven Trail

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The Little Raven Trail/Little Raven Extension Trail is within the Brainard Lake Recreation Area. It begins about a half-mile south of Brainard Lake Road on the Sourdough Trail.

In the winter, this trail is designated as skiing only.

From the Sourdough Trail, the Little Raven heads west up a steep incline for a half-mile, gradually leveling out as it approaches National Forest System Road (NFSR) 232. A turn to the north/east returns to Brainard Lake road after 0.8 miles.

To continue west on Little Raven Trail, turn south/west on NFSR 232 for 0.4 miles. Little Raven Trail breaks north/west from the road across from the old quarry. From here, the trail gently loses elevation for one mile, until it ends at the CMC Trail.

Fees Brainard Lake Recreation Area fees apply during the summer operating season (typically mid June through late October):

  • Passenger Vehicles & RVs (per vehicle/3 days): $10
  • Vans (per vehicle/1 day): $25
  • Buses (per vehicle/1 day): $40
  • Motorcycles (per cycle/3 days): $5
  • Hiker/Biker/Walker (per person/3 days): $1
  • Short-term Bicyclist: 30 minute free pass
  • American Land & Leisure Season Pass (passenger vehicles): $55
  • American Land & Leisure Season Pass (hiker/biker/walker): $20

Interagency Annual, Military, Senior or Access passes, Golden Age and Golden Access passes are accepted. No fee is charged when the seasonal gate is closed (winter season).

Usage: Heavy
Restrictions:
  • Prohibited: Pack animals (horses/llamas); recreational shooting (except for legal hunting) and being on trails posted as closed.
  • Brainard Lake Recreation Area Summer Season (May 1 – Nov 14): Dogs must be on a hand-held leash at all times; when open, developed camping is only allowed at Pawnee Campground (no camping in closed campgrounds); dispersed camping is only allowed north of the South St Vrain Creek.
  • Brainard Lake Recreation Area Winter Season (Nov 15 – Apr 30): Motorized vehicles are prohibited; dogs allowed only on the Brainard Lake and Lefthand Park Reservoir Roads; camping is prohibited within 1/4 mile of developed recreation sites except Red Rock Lake; skis only on Little Raven and CMC Ski Trail.
  • Fishing and Hunting: Permitted in accordance with regulations established by Colorado Parks & Wildlife.
Closest Towns: Ward, Colorado
Water: Lakes and streams; treat water for drinking.
Restroom: Practice Leave No Trace principles
Operated By: U.S. Forest Service
Information Center: Boulder Ranger District, 2140 Yarmouth Ave, Boulder, CO 80301

Directions: From Colorado Highway 72 at Ward, turn west onto the Brainard Lake Road. Travel 2.5 miles to the entrance portal.

Day Hiking

This trail is within the Brainard Lake Recreation Area. It connects the Sourdough Trail and Left Hand Park Reservoir Road to Brainard Lake via 1.5 miles of singletrack trail.

Fire Information  Unless seasonal restrictions are in effect, campfires must be attended at all times and cold to the touch with the bare hand before being abandoned. Collection of dead and down wood is allowed; do not break branches from standing trees for firewood.
Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Area/Length : 
Red Rock Trailhead to: Little Raven Ext. Trail – .5 miles; NFSR 232 – 1 mile; Little Raven Trail – 1

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Summerville Trail

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Summerville Trail #430

The Summerville Trail #430 begins at the Summerville Trailhead and ends at the Fossil Ridge Trail #478.  The trail ascends gradually following Summerville Creek south into the Fossil Ridge Wilderness where Wilderness Regulations apply.  There are several creek crossings along the first couple miles of the trail, most of these have logs to assist in crossing.  Eventually, the trail leaves Summerville Creek and ascends up several switchbacks.  It descends into the Crystal Creek drainage, crosses the creek and climbs out of the drainage.  The trail will continue to ascend for approximately another mile before it intersects the Fossil Ridge Trail #478.

Open Season: June – October
Usage: Medium
Best Season: Summer
Restrictions: Open to Hiking and Horseback.
Closest Towns: Almont, CO

Parking:
Summerville Trailhead:  T. 15S., R. 84W., Section 16.  U.S.G.S. Maps: Matchless Mountain and Crystal Creek.  Elevation: 8,800 feet.

Directions:
Summerville Trailhead:

From Almont, travel northeast on the Taylor River Road, CR 742 for approximately 10 miles to FSR #700.  Turn right onto FSR #700 to the trailhead.

Summerville Trail – leads south from the Taylor Canyon Road into the Fossil Ridge Wilderness. The grade is gentle to moderate for the first 1.5 miles. The trail then climbs steeply up many switchbacks that are best left to advanced skiers. The north facing slopes hold snow most of the season. The steepness and sharp turns in spots make this trail most suitable for experienced skiers. Difficulty – Intermediate to Advanced; Avalanche potential – Medium; Snowmobile use – None.

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Blue Lake Trail

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Blue Lake Trail (#959)

The first two miles of the trail follows an old wagon trail crossing footbridges over Joe Wright Creek and Fall Creek before entering the Rawah Wilderness. The trail continues to climb toward Blue Lake and Hang Lake. Blue Lake, which is five miles from the trailhead, is a very popular destination or turn-around point. Both lakes are surrounded and protected by a ¼-mile camping closure zone. A short 2.4 mile climb to the north past Blue Lake and a descent to a junction with West Branch trail (#960) allow easy access to Island and Carey Lakes, the Rawah trail (#961), Twin Crater Lakes, and Grassy Pass. Backpackers often arrange shuttles, entering by the Blue Lake trail and leaving via the West Branch or Rawah trails. The Blue Lake trailhead accommodates approximately approximately 14 vehicles.

Usage: Heavy
Restrictions: General Wilderness Regulations: Dogs must be on a hand held leash. No motorized or mechanized equipment. Camps, campfires, and stock, where allowed, at least 200 feet from water and trails. Group size limited to 12 people or stock animals combined. Closure Regulations: ¼ mile closure zone around Blue and Hang Lakes. Alpine area closure, stoves only above 10,800 feet elevation (tree line). Stock and pack animals are prohibited between May 15th and September 15th. Between September 16th and May 14th overnight stock use is prohibited.
Closest Towns: Rustic, Fort Collins
Water: Water can be filtered and treated from nearby water sources.
Restroom: Practice Leave No Trace principles.

Directions: Travel 11 miles northwest of Fort Collins on U.S. Highway 287 to Colorado Highway 14. Turn left on CO 14, and travel 54 miles west to the Blue Lake trailhead parking lot on the right, located across the highway from Forest Road 156, Long Draw Road.

Day Hiking and Backpacking

Hike for about 5 miles to enjoy the popular Blue Lake, near timberline. On a clear day, you will be able to see the Mummy Range in the distance, and maybe cooled by afternoon shadows created by the nearby Medicine Bow Mountains. The trail proceeds beyond Blue Lake to above timberline. Be sure to watch for mountain thunderstorms! The Blue Lake trailhead accommodates approximately 14 vehicles.

Fire Information Check for any seasonal fire restrictions before your hike. Portions of this trail prohibit campfires including ¼-mile around Blue and Hang Lakes and above 10,800 feet. Where allowed campfires must be at least 200 feet from water and trails. You may collect dead and down wood; do not break branches from standing trees for firewood. Please attend to campfires at all times. Touch any remaining coals with the bare hand to insure campfire is cold and dead out. Remember, if it is too hot to touch, it is too hot to leave!
Difficulty Level: Moderate

XC Skiing/Snowshoeing

This popular trail offers a long but pleasant ski or snowshoe trip to a high mountain lake. Park at the Blue Lake Trailhead along Colorado Highway 14. The trail leaves immediately from the west corner of the parking lot by the large informational display. The trail inside the wilderness can be difficult to find occasionally because it is not permanently marked beyond the wilderness boundary (reached at about the 2.5 mile mark). Follow the Blue Lake drainage to the lake from where it crosses the trail to avoid avalanche hazards along the summer route. Beware of avalanche danger above Blue Lake.

Difficulty Level: Moderate

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Deep Creek Trail

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  • Length: Approximately 4 miles and then becomes hard to follow and may require a good map to continue.
  • Difficulty Level: Requires good map and navigation skills may be required.
  • Elevation: Ranges from 5,900 up to 10,000 ft in the forest.
  • Recommended Season: Spring through fall.
  • Use: Moderate
  • Maps: 1:100,000 topographic: Glenwood Springs USGS: 1:24,000 quadrangles: Dotsero, Broken Rib Creek

Highlights: An unmaintained, unmarked primitive trail follows Deep Creek along the bottom of a 2,500 feet narrow, steep sided, cliff-bordered canyon. The trail is defined for the first three miles and then becomes diffused in places due to the narrowing of the canyon. Travel on the creek bed is necessary in some places about three or four miles up the canyon. The trail features outstanding and diverse scenery as well as wildlife watching and fishing. This area contains fossil bearing limestone formations, dolomite and sandstone cliffs. The canyon is carved deep into the White River Plateau. Vegetation bordering the creek in this diverse riparian area is dominated by spruce, cottonwood and shrubs. The creek contains rainbow, cut-throat, brown trout and brook trout. The Deep Creek area is habitat for a variety of wildlife, includin: deer, elk, black bear, mountain lion, bobcat, bald eagles and other raptors as well as a variety of small birds and mammals. The area is also a historic habitat for Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and peregrine falcons.

Access: From I-70, take the Dotsero exit #133. Drive north on Colorado River Road (Eagle County Road 301) for approximately 2 miles. Turn left and travel west on Coffee Pot Road, go about 2 miles and look for the trail on the right.

Facilities: Parking, visitor information, picnicking, toilet and roadside and walk-in camping.

Maintenance: This is an unmaintained primitive trail on the north side of the creek. This trail requires a creek crossing and there is no bridge available. The first 3 miles are easy to follow, but if you plan on continuing into the National Forest you will need a good topographic map.

Deep Creek Trail # 806

From the trailhead the trail goes up the drainage about 9 miles until you reach FDR#528. FDT#806 (Deep Creek Trail) continues by following FDR #528 approx. 3 miles to North Lime Creek Trailhead. From North Lime Creek Trailhead, hike up FDR#440 about 450 yards. You will see a trail taking off to the right (south) and a sign pointing the way to Fisher Mountain. Follow this trail. At 2.7 miles, some rock cairns mark the unsigned Deep Creek Trail, which leads to FDT#805 (Ivy Creek Trail) about 8-9 miles south.

This is a NON-MOTORIZED Trail.   ATV’s and Motorcycles are prohibited.  Mountain Bikes are allowed on the trail for the first nine miles, until you enter the Weminuche Wilderness. The trail is open for the following uses: Day Hiking, Horseback Riding, Mountain Biking, No motorized vehicles allowed.

Operational Hours: This trail is normally open year around but is usually snowed in from December through April each winter.  It is suited to cross country skiing in winter.
Reservations: No Reservations Required.
Fees No Fee
Open Season: May
Usage: Medium
Best Season: June to Sept.
Busiest Season: July
Restrictions: No Motorized vehicles.
Closest Towns: Creede, CO
Water: No
Restroom: No
Operated By: Forest Service

Directions: From the town of Creede, CO travel south on State Highway 149 toward Lake City for 1.5 miles. Take a left on airport road and go south for another 1.5 miles to the Deep Creek road. Turn right on Deep Creek Road and go .25 miles to the trailhead on the south side of the road.

Mountain Biking
To Weminuche Wilderness boundary only.

Difficulty Level: Intermediate to Difficult

Day Hiking and  Backpacking
This is a great day hike trail close to the town of Creede.  The trail follws Deep Creek up it’s canyon and alongside beaver ponds.

Difficulty Level: Intermediate to Difficult

Horse Riding

Difficulty Level: Intermediate to Difficult

Deep Creek Trail #779

The Deep Creek Trail is 6.0 miles long. It begins at Forest Road 787 and ends at Forest Trail #908.

The trail is open for the following uses: Mountain Biking, Hiking, Horseback Riding, and Hunting.

At a Glance

Closest Towns: Gunnison, CO

Directions:

To access from Forest Road 787: From Saguache, go 22 miles west on Hwy 114, then 19 miles west/northwest on Forest Road 750 (County Road NN14) and 20 miles south on Forest Road 787 to the trail. From Gunnison, go east 7 miles to Highway 114, then south 24 miles to Forest Road 804, then south to BLM Road 3085, east to BLM Road 3088/Forest Road 787, then south 20 miles to trail.

To access from forest road 600: From Creede travel 7 miles southeast to FR 600, turn east and travel about 14 miles northeast to OHV road, travel about one mile to the trailhead.

Day Hiking and Backpacking

Difficulty Level: Moderate

Deep Creek Trail #709

The Deep Creek Trail #709 alternates between Spruce/Fir/Aspen cover type and Open Meadow for the first 5 miles.. The trail intersects Deep Creek Cutoff #709.1 approximately 0.7 miles form the upper trailhead.  Raber Cabin is located 5.09 miles from the upper trailhead, at the intersection with Lands End Road, FSR #100. There are interpretive signs here, explaining the historical significance of this site. The section of trail from the rim down to the Coal Creek Trail #702 may be considered difficult due to the steep slope which it traverses. The vegetation along this section of the trail includes skunk cabbage, aspen, spruce, fir, and open meadow. As the trail descends from the rim, it provides travelers with a scenic view overlooking the Kannah Creek Basin.

Open Season: Mid-June – October
Usage: Medium
Best Season: Summer
Restrictions: Open to Hiking, Horseback, and Mountain Bike.
Closest Towns: Mesa, CO

Directions:

UPPER ACCESS:
From the town of Mesa, travel South on Highway 65 to Mesa Lakes Resort.  Turn right and go to the left side of the restaurant; follow the directional signs to Glacier Springs parking lot.  Take the Mesa Lakes Shore Trail #503 for approximately 50 yards to the upper Deep Creek Trailhead, which is on the left (west) side.

LOWER ACCESS:
From Highway 65 and Lands End Road, FSR #100, junction, travel west on the Lands End Road for approximately 3.1 miles to the Carson Lake Road, FSR #108.2. Turn left at this junction and travel 1.4 miles to the end of the road, there is a parking area on the northwest side of Carson Lake and the Coal Creek Trailhead. Follow the Coal Creek Trail #702 for approximately 1.1 miles to the junction with the lower Deep Creek Trailhead.

Parking:

UPPER TRAILHEAD:
Off of Mesa Lakes Shore Trail #503.  T. 11S.,  R. 96W.,  Sec.  34.  U.S.G.S. Map: Mesa Lakes.

LOWER TRAILHEAD:
Off the Coal Creek Trail #702.  T. 12S.,  R. 96W.,  Sec. 21.  U.S.G.S. Map: Indian Point.

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Mesa-Cortina Trail

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Mesa Cortina Trail/South Willow Falls Trails #32

This trail enters the Eagles Nest Wilderness where it winds through aspen groves and crosses open meadows where you have great views of the Williams Fork Range, Dillon Reservoir and the entire Blue River Valley. The meadows offer great opportunities for viewing wildflowers during mid-July. Eventually the trail climbs up a gorge between Buffalo Mountain and Red Peak. South Willow Falls is a cascade that tumbles over the rocks of South Willow Creek.

At a Glance

Usage:  Medium
Restrictions:  Open to Hike/Horse Only. The trail enters the Eagles Nest Wilderness Area.
Closest Towns:  Silverthorne, CO
Information Center:  Dillon Ranger District; 680 Blue River Parkway, Silverthorne, CO

Directions: From I-70 take Exit 205, Silverthorne/Dillon, and travel north on HWY 9 to the first traffic light at the intersection of Rainbow Drive / Wildernest Road. Turn left onto Wildernest Road / Ryan Gulch Rd. After crossing the Blue River, turn right onto Adams Ave. and then immediately turn left onto Royal Buffalo Drive. After 0.8 miles, turn right onto Lakeview Drive and then left onto Aspen Drive. Continue 0.2 miles and there will be a pull thru parking lot on the right-hand side of the road.

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Swamp Park Trail

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The Swamp Park Trail is a trail located in Colorado.

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Browns Creek Trail

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The Browns Creek trail offers beautiful scenery with changing vistas and vegetation. The trail follows the stream and small waterfalls can be found along the way. The lower portion of the trail begins in primarily a Ponderosa pine environment and gradually moves into spruce/fir forest. At higher elevations the trail travels through pristine meadows that end at Brown’s Lake.

Area Amenities: Interpretive Site,Accessible,Toilets,Parking
Fees No fee required.
Permit Info: Groups of 75 or more persons, must contact the Salida Ranger District and apply for a “Group Use” permit.
Usage: Medium-Heavy
Best Season: May-October
Busiest Season: July
Restrictions: Motorcycles are not permitted on this trail!
Closest Towns: Nathrop or Buena Vista, Colorado
Water: No potable water available
Restroom: Yes
Operated By: Salida Ranger District

Accessibility:
The restroom at the Browns Creek trailhead is accessible for wheelchairs. There is no wheelchair ramp to the toilet building.

Directions:
From Highway 285, midway between Poncha Springs and Buena Vista, take County Road 270 west for approximately 1.5 miles to a 4-way intersection. From the yield sign, continue traveling west. The road continues as Forest Road 272. Stay on FR 272 for about 2 miles. A sign at the cattle guard will indicate you entrance onto Nation Forest lands. Continue traveling west from the boundary sign for 2 miles. At the intersection, turn left and travel south for 1.5 miles to the trailhead.

General Notes:
Camping is not permitted at the trailhead, in order to prevent erosion of the banks along Little Browns Creek. Campers are encouraged to find camp sites further south on County Road 272.

This is a busy trail during the summer months so please practice trail courtesy and be respectful towards other users.

The Prospectors TV show has created much interest in Mt. Antero, unfortunately, most of Mt. Antero and Mt. White have already been claimed. To contact claim owners for permission to dig, you will have to do some research to find their contact information. Visit http://www.blm.gov/lr2000/index.htm  and http://qpublic.net/co/chaffee/.

 

Parking:
Parking is available across the road from the toilet.

Dispersed Camping

Camping is not permitted trailheads.

  • Camp in an existing dispersed campsite, do not create new roads or campsites. Use one way in and out to reduce disturbance of soil and vegetation. DO NOT CAUSE RESOURCE DAMAGE
  • Limit parking to bare and compacted areas. Keep motorized vehicles within one vehicle length from a designated system road or trail. Make no new tracks in campsites.
  • Camp 150 feet away from lakes, streams and trails. Dispose of wash water 100 feet away from any water source. Bury human waste in a hole 6 inches deep and 200 feet away from any water source, trail, or campsite. A portable toilet system is highly recommended. Pack out toilet paper, tampons, and leftover food.  LEAVE NO TRACE.  For more information on Leave No Trace guidelines, visit: https://lnt.org/learn/7-principles

Do not damage live trees and plants by cutting them with axes or hatchets. Don’t dig up plants, leave wildflowers for others to enjoy – don’t pick them

  • Please stay on the trails. Cutting switchbacks and avoiding wet and muddy sections can cause severe erosion and multiple paths. Alpine tundra is very susceptible to damage. Walk on durable routes of rock or talus. In the spring, travel on snow and rocks, or plan your trip during drier conditions.

Be a responsible pet owner, dogs must be leashed (36 CFR 261.8 d) and cleanup after your pet!

  • Secure pack animals 200 feet away from lakes, streams, and trails. A picket line is less damaging to trees than direct tying. Move stock often when picketing to prevent resource damage. You must follow Weed-Free forage guidelines for National Forests Grasslands in the Rocky Mountain Region.

If you choose to have a campfire, consider the following:

  • Keep it small in size and limit it to evening and early morning hours when the heat is most needed.
  • Build your fire in an existing fire ring that is at least 100 feet from water. Do not build new fire rings.
  • Avoid having fires above tree-line. Removing dead wood from Krummholz (dwarf trees near timberline) affects their survival.
  • Collection of dead and down wood for immediate campfire use is allowed except for posted sites.

Remember to put out your campfire DEAD-OUT!!

Pour water on the fire to drown ALL embers until hissing stops. Stir ashes with a shovel and scrape the sticks and logs to remove any embers. Continue adding water and stirring until all material is cold to the touch.

Permit: Groups of 75 or more persons, must contact the Salida Ranger District and apply for a “Group Use” permit.

Day Hiking

The Browns Creek trail is a great day hike but be prepared with a lunch if you plan to make it to the lake. The trail is a steady climb of 8 miles and a rest stop along the stream is a must.

Status: Open
Difficulty Level: Intermediate

Backpacking

The Browns Creek trail offers beautiful scenery with changing vistas and vegetation. The trail follows the stream and small waterfalls can be found along the way. The lower portion of the trail begins in primarily a Ponderosa pine environment and gradually moves into spruce/fir forest. At higher elevations the trail travels through pristine meadows that end at Brown’s Lake.

Horse Riding

The Browns Creek trail and the Colorado Trail are great horseback trails. The trail to Browns Lake is a steady climb but for sure footed horses it is considered a moderate ride. The Colorado Trail crosses the Browns Creek trail and travels north and south. For detailed maps or information, contact the Salida Ranger District at 719-539-3591 or stop by our office at 325 W. Rainbow Blvd., (Hwy 50) in Salida.

The area around Browns Creek and Raspberry Gulch is a popular horse camping location.

Status: Open
Open Season: May-November
Fees: No fee
Permit:  Special use permits are required for all commerical activities including outfitting and guiding. For more information, contact the Salida Ranger District at 719-539-3591.
Best Season: Spring, Summer and Fall
Difficulty Level: Intermediate

XC Skiing/Snowshoeing

The Browns Creek area is a wonderful cross-country and snowshoeing area. The terrain is flat and easy to navigate. The Evans-Rush trail was named in 1975, in memory of Art Evans and Keith Rush, local cross-country skiers who perished in an avalanche on Taylor Gulch near Maysville, Colorado. The trail is a great introductory route for beginners.

Amenities
Toilets Vault toilet
Accessible Toilet is accessible
Parking Across from the trailhead
Interpretive Site Interpretive signs are located at the trailhead.

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Devils Thumb Trail

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From the trailhead, cross the footbridge and take the Devils Thumb Trail, which climbs steeply for about a half-mile on an old road. The Devils Thumb Bypass turns right (north) just before the second bridge.

The bypass trail is shorter and crosses open meadows to the north of the creek, but it bypasses intersections with King Lake and Woodland Lake trails.

This trail enters into the Indian Peaks Wilderness.

Diamond Lake Trail forks right (north) about a half-mile before the trail reaches Jasper Lake. Jasper Lake is surrounded on three sides with trees and a steep ridgeline to the north.

The trail continues another mile to Devils Thumb Lake, and a mile beyond that to the Continental Divide.

Permit Info: This trail lies within the Indian Peaks Wilderness Area:

  • Camping permits required for all overnight trips between June 1 and September 15. Overnight permits cost $5 per group, per trip from June 1 through September 15.
  • Organized groups are required to have a permit for both camping and day-hiking year round. Day-hiking permits are free.
Usage: Heavy
Restrictions: Indian Peak Wilderness restrictions apply:

  • Motorized and mechanized vehicles are prohibited.
  • Pets must be on a hand-held leash at all times.
  • Campfires prohibited.
  • Campsites must be at least 100 feet away from water and trail.
  • Group size is limited to 12 (people and livestock combined).

Fishing and hunting: permitted in accordance with regulations established by the Colorado Parks & Wildlife.

Closest Towns: Nederland, Colorado
Water: Lakes and streams; treat water for drinking.
Restroom: Practice Leave No Trace principles
Operated By: U.S. Forest Service
Information Center: Boulder Ranger District, 2140 Yarmouth Ave, Boulder, CO 80301

Directions:
From Nederland, head south on Colorado Highway 119 for a half-mile. Turn west onto County Road 130, signed for Eldora. Follow the paved road through the valley to the Town of Eldora, where the pavement ends. Continue beyond the end of the pavement for 0.75 miles to the fork in the road. The left fork goes to Hessie Trailhead.

Day Hiking

This trail is among the most popular trails in the Indian Peaks Wilderness Area. It extends from Hessie Trailhead for 6.5 miles to the Continental Divide. Along the way, it passes Jasper Lake and Devils Thumb Lake. The trail intersects Lost Lake Trail, King Lake Trail, Woodland Lake Trail, and Diamond Lake Trail.

Difficulty Level: Intermediate to Difficult

Backpacking

Fire Information Campfires are prohibited year-round.
Difficulty Level: Intermediate to Difficult
Area/Length : 
Hessie Trailhead to: Jasper Lake 4.5 miles; Devils Thumb Lake – 5.5 miles; Continental Divide – 6.5

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Mineral Belt Trail

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The Mineral Belt National Recreation Trail is an 11.6 mile all-season biking/walking trail that loops around Leadville, Colorado and through its historic mining district. The trail’s setting is quintessentially Colorado Rocky Mountain landscape. Groves of aspen, conifer forests, wildflower meadows, and open vista sage parks are interspersed with once-booming mine sites. Ever-present views of the Sawatch and Mosquito mountain ranges provide perspective and a sense of permanence to the area. Several signs along the way provide historical snippets about Leadville’s colorful past. The trail is designed for bicycles, longboards, walkers, wheelchairs, strollers and in-line skaters. When the snow falls, snowcats groom the trail to provide access to Nordic skiers, snowshoers and winter-bikers.

About six miles of this trail meanders through the historic Leadville Mining District. In part the trail follows old mining-camp railbeds. “What makes this trail unique is that it goes through one of the greatest mining districts in the world,” says Lake County, Colorado Assessor Howard A. Tritz, an original member of the group which spearheaded trail development. “It has some of the best scenery anywhere, and it’s accessible and available to everyone, visitors and locals alike, regardless of age or ability.”

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