American Discovery Trail

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The American Discovery Trail is a system of recreational trails and roads which collectively form a coast-to-coast hiking and biking trail across the mid-tier of the United States. Horses can also be ridden on most of this trail. It starts on theDelmarva Peninsula on the Atlantic Ocean and ends on the northern California coast on the Pacific Ocean. The trail has northern and southern alternates for part of its distance, passing through Chicago and St Louis respectively. The total length of the trail including both the north and south routes is 6,800 miles (10,900 km). The northern route covers 4,834 miles (7,780 km) with the southern route covering 5,057 miles (8,138 km). It is the only non-motorized coast-to-coast trail.

The trail passes through 14 national parks and 16 national forests and uses sections of or connects to five National Scenic Trails, 10 National Historic Trails, and 23 National Recreation Trails. For part of its distance, it is coincident with the North Country Trail and the Buckeye Trail.

The trail passes through the District of Columbia and the following 15 states:

  • Delaware (45 miles (72 km))
  • Maryland (270 miles (430 km))
  • West Virginia (288 miles (463 km))
  • Ohio (524 miles (843 km))
  • Indiana (250 miles (400 km))
  • Illinois (219 miles (352 km))
  • Kentucky (524 miles (843 km))
  • Iowa (512 miles (824 km))
  • Missouri (343 miles (552 km))
  • Nebraska (523 miles (842 km))
  • Kansas (570 miles (920 km))
  • Colorado (1,153 miles (1,856 km))
  • Utah (593 miles (954 km))
  • Nevada (496 miles (798 km))
  • California (276 miles (444 km))

Hiking Records

Joyce and Pete Cottrell, of Whitefield, New Hampshire, were the first to backpack the entire official route of the American Discovery Trail. They hiked the segments out of sequence over two calendar years, finishing in 2003.

The first hikers to complete the trail in one continuous walk were Marcia and Ken Powers, a wife and husband team from Pleasanton, California. Their trailwalk lasted from February 27 to October 15, 2005. They started out from Cape Henlopen State Park in Delaware and ended at Point Reyes, California. They trailed 5,058 miles (8,140 km) by foot, averaging 22 miles (35 km) a day.

The first person to backpack the entire 6,800 miles (including both Northern and Southern sections) in one continuous hike was Mike “Lion King” Daniel. He started from Cape Henlopen State Park on June 17, 2007, and ended at Point Reyes, California on November 5, 2008.

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References

Apex Trail

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The Apex Trail is a trail located in Colorado.

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References

  • None

Beaver Brook Trail

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Beaver Brook Trailhead Area: Beaver Brook Watershed from the Old Squaw Pass Trailhead, west one mile to the intersection of the Beaver Brook Trail and the North Beaver Brook Road. No discharging a firearm, air rifle or gas gun, including paintball guns, except for persons possessing a valid Colorado hunting license lawfully involved in hunting and harvesting game. (Order No.10-07-2012-01)

Beaver Brook Trail from the Old Squaw Pass Trailhead to the junction of the trail and the Beaver Brook road. T. 4 S. R. 72 W. SE ¼ of the SW ¼ of Sec. 15 and the NW ¼ of NW ¼ of Sec. 22 and in the NW ¼ of Sec. 23.

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References

  • None

Big Dry Creek Trail

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The Big Dry Creek Trail, a recreation trail, roughly follows the creek from Standley Lake Regional Park to Interstate 25.

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References

  • Wikipedia
  • Image by Jeffrey Beall – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=33396902

Clear Creek Trail

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Colorado #1776 (Clear Creek Trail)

This segment of the Colorado Trail (1776) begins at Clear Creek on Chaffee County Road 390 and, after gaining 4,520 feet, ends at North Cottonwood Creek 18.5 miles to the south. A re-route completed in 2007 moved the trail off private property making access easier. The trail climbs out of Clear Creek and enters the Collegiate Peaks Wilderness. Follow all posted Wilderness guidelines when entering the area. The trail then continues into Pine Creek and then Frenchman’s Creek before dropping into North Cottonwood. This segment spends a good portion above 11,000 feet and brings you close to three Fourteeners (Mounts Oxford, Harvard, and Columbia).

Usage: Medium
Best Season: Year-round
Busiest Season: Summer and Fall
Restrictions: Wilderness regulations apply within Collegiate Peaks Wilderness. Be aware of special regulations concerning group size, pets and permits. No mechanical or motorized vehicles are allowed in Wilderness. In keeping with the character of Wilderness, signage is minimal.
Closest Towns: Leadville, CO
Water: None
Restroom: None
Information Center: Leadville Ranger District

General Notes:

The Colorado Trail is a backcountry multi-use trail connecting Denver and Durango, CO. It is over 483 miles of contiguous trail. The exact mileage for the trail is ever changing as trail segments are changed and re-routed. The project that was to be the Colorado Trail began in 1973 with a grant from the Gates Foundation and was completed in 1987. The trail sees considerable usage from day hikers, mountain bikers (although not in sections in Wilderness), horseback riders, and die-hard thru-hikers.
The trail is made up of 28 segments, varying in length from 10 miles (segment 2) to over 32 miles (Segment 6). Each segment is unique in its features and terrain. Some segments don’t allow dogs and others can’t be used by mountain bikes in Wilderness Areas (although these often have bypasses). The trail is marked throughout by small trail markers on trees and signposts. Signage for the Colorado Trail can be found along highways, at trailheads, and trail intersections.

The Colorado Trail was built and is currently maintained by the non-profit Colorado Trail Foundation and the United States Forest Service. The Colorado Trail and the Continental Divide Trail follow the same path for approximately 200 miles.

Safety Information

Keep in mind the high altitude can effect even the healthiest people. Be aware of symptoms of acute mountain sickness, particularly in children, who are more susceptible than adults.

Weather in the high country is unpredictable and chages rapidly, so bring rain gear and warm clothing with you, as well as plenty of food and water.

Clear Creek Trail #516

The Clear Creek trail is 12.5 miles long. This is a loop trail that begins and ends on Forest Road #402.

Open Season: May
Usage: Light
Restrictions: Open to motorcycles, mountain bikes, hiking, and horseback riding.
Closest Towns: Montrose, CO
Operated By: Forest Service

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References

Two Ponds National Refuge Trail

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The Two Ponds National Refuge Trail is a trail located in Colorado.

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References

  • None